Special Needs Trusts Explained

estate planning lawyer in New YorkSpecial Needs Trusts are used to help family members, loved ones and friends who suffer from debilitating mental and physical problems. Special Needs Trusts are also referred to as Supplemental Needs Trusts. The purpose of these trusts is to set aside funds and other valuable assets to help mentally or physically disabled individuals live with comfort and dignity. The assets put into these trusts can be utilized by the disabled individuals while not creating any problem which jeopardizes them from receiving government benefits such as Medicaid and Social Security Disability. Some situations where these trusts are commonly utilized are where the beneficiary of the trust has received a large award from a medical malpractice case, a personal injury case, or through an inheritance. These trusts set up a procedure where a trustee is appointed. This trustee uses the funds in the trust to pay for expenses of the beneficiary of the trust. The beneficiary of the trust cannot have actual access to the trust funds.

Two Types of Special Needs Trusts

The first type of Special Needs Trust is called a First Party Supplemental Needs Trust. In this situation a family member, usually a parent, sets up the trust for a person who is mentally or physically handicapped and also under 65 years of age. After the death of the beneficiary, if the beneficiary had been receiving Medicaid, Medicaid has a right to recover the money paid to the beneficiary during the course of their lifetime for medical benefits from whatever funds still remain in the trust at the time of the beneficiary’s death.

Third Party Special Needs Trusts

A Third Party Special Needs Trust can be created for a special person at any age. This trust also protects the beneficiary’s rights to receive benefits such as Medicaid or Social Security Disability. With regard to this type of trust, when the beneficiary dies, the assets of the trust are distributed pursuant to the terms of the trust to the individual named as beneficiary in the trust. Medicaid cannot go after the assets in the trust to repay them for funds expended during the lifetime of the beneficiary of the trust.

Conclusion

The two types of Special Needs Trusts can help special individuals, disabled individuals and the chronically ill while allowing them to collect all applicable governmental benefits. These types of trusts have helped tens of thousands of Americans with medical or mental problems live happy, comfortable, fulfilling lives.trusts attorney on Long Island

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